Unhappy teachers bad for students

Sunday June 10, 2012

http://thestar.com.my/education/story.asp?file=/2012/6/10/education/11415123&sec=education

I REFER to the letter “Ministry’s policy on teacher transfers” (StarEducate, June 3).

I would never question the right of the Education Ministry to transfer teachers according to its budget and the availability of the posting requested.

However, I wish the Ministry had given better reasons than to say that students’ welfare must be prioritised or that there are no vacancies. These reasons are not convincing.

When a teacher is unhappy, he or she will not make a good teacher. So, how can it be in the interest of the students to have a teacher who does not want to be there?

In my opinion, the teacher’s welfare comes first. A teacher who is happy and at peace, knowing that his rights have been respected, will do the best possible job.

I also find it hard to believe that there are no vacancies in certain states. Every year some teachers retire, others leave temporarily to further their studies, and still others may resign.

Finally, the Ministry says it will consider transfer applications from teachers with critical illness such as cancer or a heart condition. Does a teacher have to be half dead before he can get the Ministry’s attention?

If a person is unhappy in his job, he will soon develop some physical ailment which will render him unable to discharge his duties in full.

A teacher who has been transferred due to sickness will not be able to cope with his full teaching load.

How is this going to help either the teacher, the students, or the Ministry? Why not give the teacher the transfer he wants while he is still in good health?

It appears that the teacher in question has been waiting three years for a transfer. Considering that one can get depressed in a matter of hours if he does not get his heartfelt desire, I think this particular teacher has waited long enough and the Ministry should show some mercy and clemency.

MARISA DEMORI