UPM first to get AACSB recognition

Tuesday July 31, 2012

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/7/31/nation/11763695&sec=nation

By JEANNETTE GOON
educate@thestar.com.my

SERDANG: Universiti Putra Malaysia has become the first Malaysian higher education institution and the sixth in South-East Asia to receive the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation.

“We now have international recognition for our business, management and accounting programmes.

“Very few business schools in the world are given this accreditation,” its vice-chancellor Datuk Dr Radin Umar Radin Sohadi said.

The AACSB International, according to its website, was founded in 1916 and is the longest-serving global accrediting body for business schools that offer undergraduate, master’s, and doctorate degrees in business and accounting.

Dr Radin Umar said all the business programmes in UPM had to undergo scrutiny and to fulfil 21 criteria before it was given one of the “most prestigious recognitions”.

“The last audit by AACSB was in June,” he added.

He also said that this was part of the National Higher Education Strategic Plan, which is intended to improve the quality of Malaysian graduates by the year 2020.

Besides the Faculty of Economics and Management, UPM’s newly-formed Putra Business School (PBS) was also accreditated.

The PBS, Dr Radin Umar said, followed a similar concept as Harvard Business School.

He said the PBS was formed to speed up the process of developing autonomy for the university’s business programmes in order to fulfil one of the AACSB accreditation criteria.

With such stringent audit measures, he said it was not surprising that less than 5% of the world’s business programmes met the AACSB standard.

A statement from UPM quoted AACSB International president and chief executive officer John J. Fernandes as saying that the accreditation meant that an institution had achieved the highest honour in business school accreditation.

Newly-appointed president and CEO of PBS Prof Arfah Salleh said that this was a “homegrown business school” that would benefit Malaysian students.