‘Special needs kids faring well’

Tuesday November 20, 2012

http://thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2012/11/20/nation/12344364&sec=nation

Sekolah Kebangsaan Permatang Badak student Ahmad Sulaiman, 12, running triumphantly to father Benzin Dagok, 51, to show off his excellent UPSR results in Kuantan. Ahmad Sulaiman scored As in all his subjects. Looking on proudly is mother Jamariah Harun, 47, together with his siblings. In Pahang, 3,054 UPSR candidates scored all As out of 26,760 candidates who sat for the examination. — BernamaSekolah Kebangsaan Permatang Badak student Ahmad Sulaiman, 12, running triumphantly to father Benzin Dagok, 51, to show off his excellent UPSR results in Kuantan. Ahmad Sulaiman scored As in all his subjects. Looking on proudly is mother Jamariah Harun, 47, together with his siblings. In Pahang, 3,054 UPSR candidates scored all As out of 26,760 candidates who sat for the examination. — Bernama

PUTRAJAYA: More special needs candidates have received good grades in this year’s Ujian Pencapaian Sekolah Rendah (UPSR) examination.

Twenty-five out of 1,752 special needs candidates who sat for the examination scored all As as compared to 17 last year.

Malaysian Examinations Syndicate (MES) director Dr Na’imah Ishak said of these high achievers, three candidates were blind, seven were visually-impaired while the rest had other disabilities.

“The percentage of special needs candidates who received good scores (those with a minimum Grade C, excluding straight A scorers) also increased from 218 candidates in 2011 to 295 candidates this year,” she said yesterday.

However, the overall performance in this year’s UPSR dipped slightly from last year.

Of the 503,928 candidates who sat for the examination, 17,251 candidates or 3.42% scored below the minimum achievement (those with grades D, E, or a combination of both) as compared to 2.88% last year.

The gap between urban and rural candidates, who scored below the minimum achievement, has also widened.

A total of 6,999 urban candidates and 10,221 rural candidates failed to obtain a minimum Grade C this year as compared to 6,615 urban candidates and 7,225 rural candidates in 2011.

However, Dr Na’imah said more students received good or average scores.

It was up to the state education departments and schools to further analyse the results, she added.